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12/28/10

 

 

 

Kansas

COUNTY FACTS

Page 6

Click on the county name below to see the county facts:

SEWARD
SHAWNEE
SHERIDAN
SHERMAN
SMITH
STAFFORD
STANTON
STEVENS
SUMNER
THOMAS
TREGO
WABAUNSEE
WALLACE
WASHINGTON
WICHITA
WILSON
WOODSON
WYANDOTTE

Seward County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Seward County

County Seat:

Liberal

Origin of Name:

Named for William H. Seward (1801-1872), senator from New York and a leader of the anti-slavery wing of the Whig Party. Joining the Republican Party in 1855, he served as Secretary of State under Lincoln and Johnson, and arranged to purchase Alaska ("Seward's Folly") from Russia.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Liberal (city)

19,666

Fargo Township

1,684

Liberal Township

803

Morris Township

[defunct]

Seward Township

357

Total population:

22,510

 

 

Township map of Seward County, 2000

Population:

1880

(5)

1890

(1,503)

1900

(822)

1910

(4,091)

1920

(6,220)

1930

(8,075)

1940

(6,540)

1950

(9,972)

1960

(15,930)

1970

(15,744)

1980

(17,071)

1990

(18,743)

2000

(22,510)

 

 

Shawnee County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Shawnee County

County Seat:

Topeka

Origin of Name:

Organized in 1855.  It was carved out of what was, before the treaty of 1854, Shawnee Indian lands, hence the name.  General H. J. Strickler, of Tecumseh, who was a member of the council in 1855 and the joint committee on Counties, claimed Shawnee for the name of his county, a preference stoutly contended for by the Reverend Thomas Johnson for the county in which the legislature was sitting.  However, the committee yielded to General Strickland and, without solicitation, complimented Mr. Johnson by conferring his own name upon his county.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Topeka (city)

122,377

Auburn Township

2,787

Dover Township

1,734

Grove Township

473

Menoken Township

1,371

Mission Township

9,070

Monmouth Township

2,786

Rossville Township

1,681

Silver Lake Township

1,949

Soldier Township

12,867

Tecumseh Township

7,822

Topeka Township

931

Williamsport Township

4,023

Total population:

169,871

 

 

Township map of Shawnee County, 2000

Population:

1860

(3,513)

1870

(13,121)

1880

(29,093)

1890

(49,172)

1900

(53,727)

1910

(61,874)

1920

(69,159)

1930

(85,200)

1940

(91,247)

1950

(105,418)

1960

(141,286)

1970

(155,322)

1980

(154,916)

1990

(160,976)

2000

(169,871)

 

 

Sheridan County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Sheridan County

County Seat:

Hoxie

Origin of Name and history:

Sheridan County is named for General Phillip H. Sheridan (1831-1888) of Civil War fame and active in the post-Civil War Indian campaigns on the plains. Sheridan County was created by an act of the Kansas Legislature in 1873. Settlements began here in the 1860's, but it was not until the influx of settlers in 1878 and 1879 that events led to official organization. The town of Kenneth, begun in 1879 north of Hoxie, was the county seat until 1886.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Adell Township

13

Bloomfield Township

45

Bowcreek Township

54

East Saline Township

66

Kenneth Township

1,430

Logan Township

115

Parnell Township

104

Prairie Dog Township

71

Saline Township

[defunct]

Sheridan Township

269

Solomon Township

248

Springbrook Township

108

Union Township

60

Valley Township

139

West Saline Township

91

Total population:

2,813

 

 

Township map of Sheridan County, 2000

Population:

1880

(1,567)

1890

(3,733)

1900

(3,819)

1910

(5,651)

1920

(5,484)

1930

(6,038)

1940

(5,312)

1950

(4,607)

1960

(4,267)

1970

(3,859)

1980

(3,544)

1990

(3,043)

2000

(2,813)

 

 

Sherman County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Sherman County

County Seat:

Goodland

Origin of Name:

Named for General William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891), most famous for his scorched-earth tactics during the Civil War, during the march from Atlanta to the sea. As general commander of the U.S. Army after 1869, he asserted that the aim of Indian policy should be to place the tribes on reservations and make them stay there, and he directed the campaigns through the 1870s that put this policy into practice.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Goodland (city)

4,948

Grant Township

115

Iowa Township

44

Itasca Township

321

Lincoln Township

95

Llanos Township

43

Logan Township

246

McPherson Township

52

Shermanville Township

51

Smoky Township

87

Stateline Township

344

Union Township

56

Voltaire Township

252

Washington Township

106

Total population:

6,760

 

 

Township map of Sherman County, 2000

Population:

1880

(13)

1890

(5,261)

1900

(3,341)

1910

(4,549)

1920

(5,592)

1930

(7,400)

1940

(6,421)

1950

(7,373)

1960

(6,682)

1970

(7,792)

1980

(7,759)

1990

(6,926)

2000

(6,760)

 

 

Smith County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Smith County

County Seat:

Smith Center

Origin of Name:

In memory of Maj. J. Nelson Smith, 2nd Colorado Cavalry, killed in action at the Battle of the Little Blue, 21 Oct 1864.  Organized in 1872.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Banner Township

54

Beaver Township

60

Blaine Township

60

Cedar Township

619

Center Township

2,094

Cora Township

38

Crystal Plains Township

40

Dor Township

46

Garfield Township

33

German Township

34

Harlan Township

100

Harvey Township

130

Houston Township

206

Lane Township

134

Lincoln Township

73

Logan Township

47

Martin Township

24

Oak Township

399

Pawnee Township

35

Pleasant Township

34

Swan Township

42

Valley Township

75

Washington Township

63

Webster Township

47

White Rock Township

49

Total population:

4,536

 

 

Township map of Smith County, 2000

Population:

1870

(66)

1880

(13,883)

1890

(15,613)

1900

(16,384)

1910

(15,365)

1920

(14,985)

1930

(13,545)

1940

(10,582)

1950

(8,846)

1960

(7,776)

1970

(6,757)

1980

(5,947)

1990

(5,078)

2000

(4,536)

 

 

Stafford County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Stafford County

County Seat:

St. John

Origin of Name:

In memory of Capt. Lewis Stafford of Co. E, First Kansas Infantry, who was accidentally killed at Young's Point, La., on 31 Jan 1863.

Description and interesting notes:

Stafford county is mostly flat country with occasional clumps of grass-covered sand dunes. The eastern part has marshy areas that are home to millions of waterfowl. The gentle North Fork of the Ninnescah river meanders across the southeast quadrant.
 
        The AT&SF railroad and highway US-50 run across Stafford county, serving Zenith, Stafford, St. John, and Macksville. Highway US 281 runs north-south though the middle. The Missouri Pacific had track from Radium, in northwest Stafford county through Seward, Hudson, Stafford, and Neola but it has been abandoned.
 
        Most of the economic life of the county involves cattle, winter wheat, or petroleum.

·         The main square in St. John seems like it should have a courthouse on it, but doesn't. Instead, the courthouse is on the southeast corner of the square with an angled facade facing the square. Notice the older Dillon's store on the north side of the square; its style gives a glimpse of past retail fashion.

·         The Quivira National Wildlife Refuge is a 22,000 acre wonderland for birdwatchers.

·         The Ida Long Goodman library in St. John is a good model for smaller Kansas towns. By combining the city and school district libraries, both are better than either could be alone.

·         Hudson is the home of a famous flour mill and is a lively, prosperous little town. Tours of the Stafford County Flour Mills can be arranged; call (620) 458-4121.

·         Zenith has a tan brick church and school (abandoned), grain elevator, and RR tracks.

·         Neola, in the southeast corner, is kind of a sad place nestled in a sandhill area beside rusting, weed-grown tracks. There's almost nothing left of the dreams and sweat invested there.

·         Curtis Cafe in Stafford has hundreds of picture puzzles (assembled) mounted on the walls.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Albano Township

56

Byron Township

80

Clear Creek Township

36

Cleveland Township

68

Cooper Township

[defunct]

Douglas Township

138

East Cooper Township

90

Fairview Township

98

Farmington Township

591

Hayes Township

212

Lincoln Township

113

North Seward Township

186

Ohio Township

409

Putnam Township

19

Richland Township

70

Rose Valley Township

74

Seward Township

[defunct]

South Seward Township

55

St. John Township

1,037

Stafford Township

1,291

Union Township

41

West Cooper Township

64

York Township

61

Total population:

4,789

 

 

Township map of Stafford County, 2000

Population:

1880

(4,755)

1890

(8,520)

1900

(9,829)

1910

(12,510)

1920

(11,559)

1930

(10,460)

1940

(10,487)

1950

(8,816)

1960

(7,451)

1970

(5,943)

1980

(5,694)

1990

(5,365)

2000

(4,789)

 

 

Stanton County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Stanton County

County Seat:

Johnson City

Origin of Name:

Named for Edwin M. Stanton (1814-1869), Secretary of War from 1862 to 1868.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Big Bow Township

338

Manter Township

312

Stanton Township

1,756

Total population:

2,406

 

 

Township map of Stanton County, 2000

Population:

1880

(5)

1890

(1,031)

1900

(327)

1910

(1,034)

1920

(908)

1930

(2,152)

1940

(1,443)

1950

(2,263)

1960

(2,108)

1970

(2,287)

1980

(2,339)

1990

(2,333)

2000

(2,406)

 

 

Stevens County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Stevens County

County Seat:

Hugoton

Origin of Name:

In honor of Thaddeus Stevens (1792-1868), a U.S. senator from Pennsylvania and a passionate advocate of Radical Republicanism.  He was famous for his fierce abolitionist beliefs.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Banner Township

164

Center Township

4,131

Cleveland Township

[defunct]

Dermot Township

[defunct]

Harmony Township

143

Lafayette Township

[defunct]

Lincoln Township

[defunct]

Moscow Township

711

Niagara Township

[defunct]

Voorhees Township

145

West Center Township

169

Woodsdale Township

[defunct]

Total population:

5,463

 

 

Township map of Stevens County, 2000

Population:

1880

(12)

1890

(1,418)

1900

(620)

1910

(2,453)

1920

(3,943)

1930

(4,655)

1940

(3,193)

1950

(4,516)

1960

(4,400)

1970

(4,198)

1980

(4,736)

1990

(5,048)

2000

(5,463)

 

 

Sumner County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Sumner County

County Seat:

Wellington

Origin of Name:

In honor of Charles Sumner (1811-1874), a U.S. senator from Massachusetts. The Senate's leading opponent of slavery, he was beaten unconscious on the Senate floor by a South Carolina congressman after one speech Sumner made against pro-slavery groups in Kansas in 1856. During the Civil War, he became a leader of the Radical Republicans, arguing for black suffrage and urging an extensive program of economic aid, land distribution and free education for freed slaves. He also lead the impeachment movement against President Andrew Johnson.

Description and history:

Cattle, wheat, and railroads have defined Sumner County. The flat rich soil that covers much of the county produces vast amounts of wheat. As you drive through the county you can always see several grain elevators. The Santa Fe railroad runs east/west and the Union Pacific serves Peck, Riverdale, Wellington, Perth, Corbin, and Caldwell connecting Wichita and Enid, OK, over track once owned by the Rock Island. Highway US 160 runs across the county, and US 81/I-35 runs north/south.

 

Early interest in the county was driven by the economic oppportunities offered by the herds of cattle coming up the Chisholm trail from Texas. Later the Oklahoma land rushes created and then drained towns in Sumner County.
 
Mrs Susanna Madora Salter (born 3/2/1860) served as mayor of Argonia in 1887 She was the first woman mayor elected in the US. The Salter home at Osage & Garfield is now a museum.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Caldwell (city)

1,284

Wellington (city)

8,647

Avon Township

319

Belle Plaine Township

3,504

Bluff Township

74

Caldwell Township

200

Chikaskia Township

69

Conway Township

1,286

Creek Township

241

Dixon Township

738

Downs Township

159

Eden Township

452

Falls Township

187

Gore Township

2,220

Greene Township

80

Guelph Township

164

Harmon Township

277

Illinois Township

178

Jackson Township

153

London Township

774

Morris Township

35

Osborne Township

273

Oxford Township

1,403

Palestine Township

249

Ryan Township

239

Seventy-Six Township

238

South Haven Township

670

Springdale Township

761

Sumner Township

150

Valverde Township

147

Walton Township

431

Wellington Township

344

Total population:

25,946

 

 

Township map of Sumner County, 2000

Population:

1870

(22)

1880

(20,812)

1890

(30,271)

1900

(25,631)

1910

(30,654)

1920

(29,213)

1930

(28,960)

1940

(26,163)

1950

(23,646)

1960

(25,316)

1970

(23,553)

1980

(24,928)

1990

(25,841)

2000

(25,946)

 

 

Thomas County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

October 08, 1885

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Thomas County

County Seat:

Colby

Origin of Name:

Named for Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas (1816-1870), called the 'Rock of Chickamauga' for his defense of that Georgia city in 1863.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Colby (city)

5,450

Barrett Township

124

East Hale Township

137

Kingery Township

93

Lacey Township

132

Menlo Township

112

Morgan Township

755

North Randall Township

107

Randall Township

[defunct]

Rovohl Township

143

Smith Township

213

South Randall Township

267

Summers Township

197

Wendell Township

84

West Hale Township

366

Total population:

8,180

 

 

Township map of Thomas County, 2000

Population:

1880

(161)

1890

(5,538)

1900

(4,112)

1910

(5,455)

1920

(5,517)

1930

(7,334)

1940

(6,425)

1950

(7,572)

1960

(7,358)

1970

(7,501)

1980

(8,451)

1990

(8,258)

2000

(8,180)

 

 

Trego County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

June 21, 1879

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Trego County

County Seat:

WaKeeney

Origin of Name:

In memory of Edgar P. Trego, captain of Co. H, 8th Kansas Infantry, who was killed in action at Chicamauga, Ga., on 19 Sept 1863.  Organized in 1879.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Collyer Township

368

Franklin Township

60

Glencoe Township

70

Ogallah Township

214

Riverside Township

117

WaKeeney Township

2,398

Wilcox Township

92

Total population:

3,319

 

 

Township map of Trego County, 2000

Population:

1870

(166)

1880

(2,535)

1890

(2,535)

1900

(2,722)

1910

(5,398)

1920

(5,880)

1930

(6,470)

1940

(5,822)

1950

(5,868)

1960

(5,473)

1970

(4,436)

1980

(4,165)

1990

(3,694)

2000

(3,319)

 

 

Wabaunsee County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 11, 1859

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Wabaunsee County

County Seat:

Alma

Origin of Name:

Organized as Richardson in 1859.  The county was created in 1855. Colonel "Dick" Richardson, of Illinois, for whom the county was first named, was the leader in the House of Representatives on the Democratic side in the debate on the Kansas-Nebraska Bill. In February, 1859, the name was changed to Waubaunse, that being the name of a chief of the Pottawatomie Indians (Wah-Bahn-Se 1760s?-1845 or 6).

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Alma Township

1,137

Farmer Township

119

Garfield Township

590

Kaw Township

242

Maple Hill Township

930

Mill Creek Township

293

Mission Creek Township

495

Newbury Township

1,045

Plumb Township

640

Rock Creek Township

84

Wabaunsee Township

455

Washington Township

83

Wilmington Township

772

Total population:

6,885

 

 

Township map of Wabaunsee County, 2000

Population:

1860

(1,023)

1870

(3,362)

1880

(8,756)

1890

(11,720)

1900

(12,813)

1910

(12,721)

1920

(11,424)

1930

(10,830)

1940

(9,219)

1950

(7,212)

1960

(6,648)

1970

(6,397)

1980

(6,867)

1990

(6,603)

2000

(6,885)

 

 

Wallace County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 11, 1868

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Wallace County

County Seat:

Sharon Springs

Origin of Name:

In honor of Gen. William H. L. Wallace. Commander of the Second Division at the Battle of Shiloh (6 Apr 1862), he was wounded in action and died a few days later, on 10 Apr 1862.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Harrison Township

85

Morton Township

[defunct]

North Township

[defunct]

Sharon Springs Township

1,096

Stockholm Township

[defunct]

Vega Township

[defunct]

Wallace Township

175

Weskan Township

393

Total population:

1,749

 

 

Township map of Wallace County, 2000

Population:

1870

(538)

1880

(686)

1890

(2,468)

1900

(1,178)

1910

(2,759)

1920

(2,424)

1930

(2,882)

1940

(2,216)

1950

(2,508)

1960

(2,069)

1970

(2,215)

1980

(2,045)

1990

(1,821)

2000

(1,749)

 

 

Washington County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 20, 1857

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Washington County

County Seat:

Washington

Origin of Name:

In honor of George Washington (1732-1799), first president of the United States.

Description:

Washington, County, Kansas, is an agricultural area thirty miles square with twelve incorporated communities. Crops grown in the county include mainly wheat, milo or grain sorghum, corn, soybeans, alfalfa, prairie hay and some sunflowers. The county ranks high in the state in pork production. Many cow-calf herds roam the beautiful prairie grasslands.

The county is very diversified in industry ranging from metal fabrication companies, construction, silk screening, woodworking, pet wholesaling, pallet building, and machining companies.

The geography of the county finds us located in three geologic regions: the Smoky Hills, Flint Hills, and Glaciated Regions. This gives us a diverse geography of fertile river and creek valleys, to flatland regions, to rolling hills, varying across the county.

-   Mrs. Billie Jo Smart, Washington County Economic Development

History:

Settlers began to come into this area after the Kansas Territory was opened in 1854. However, most of the thousands of goldseekers traveled across Washington County in 1849 along the Oregon Trail on their way to California. Not until 1857 did the first settlers come in numbers to carve out farms in the rich creek and river valleys. Little did the gold seekers realize that the lush prairie grass covered a wealth far more precious and lasting that the glitter of metal.

Swedes, Germans, Dutch, Danes, Bohemians, French, Scots, English, and Irish settled in the county until it became a miniature melting pot all in itself.

The map shown here is from History of Kansas by Noble Prentis (1899).

The sixth principal meridian was established in the northwest corner of the county on June 11, 1856, and a red sandstone marker was set at this point. From this point all land in Kansas, Nebraska, three quarters of Colorado, most of Wyoming, and a small part of South Dakota was surveyed and numbered. A marker, dedicated on June 11, 1987, or 131 years after being set by Charles Manners, today marks this location.

-   Mrs. Billie Jo Smart, Washington County Economic Development

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Washington (city)

1,223

Barnes Township

233

Brantford Township

91

Charleston Township

99

Clifton Township

459

Coleman Township

64

Farmington Township

192

Franklin Township

139

Grant Township

25

Greenleaf Township

450

Haddam Township

246

Hanover Township

884

Highland Township

22

Independence Township

169

Kimeo Township

75

Lincoln Township

84

Linn Township

599

Little Blue Township

93

Logan Township

109

Lowe Township

76

Mill Creek Township

274

Sheridan Township

119

Sherman Township

249

Strawberry Township

130

Union Township

161

Washington Township

218

Total population:

6,483

 

 

Township map of Washington County, 2000

Population:

1860

(383)

1870

(4,081)

1880

(14,910)

1890

(22,894)

1900

(21,963)

1910

(20,229)

1920

(17,984)

1930

(17,112)

1940

(15,921)

1950

(12,977)

1960

(10,739)

1970

(9,249)

1980

(8,543)

1990

(7,073)

2000

(6,483)

 

 

Wichita County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Wichita County

County Seat:

Leoti

Origin of Name:

Organized December 24, 1886.  Boundaries defined in 1873.  Wichita was the name of a confederacy of Caddoan Indians.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Beaver Township

[defunct]

Coronado Township

[defunct]

Edwards Township

[defunct]

Leoti Township

2,531

Sinn Township

[defunct]

Sumner Township

[defunct]

Whitewoman Township

[defunct]

Yates Township

[defunct]

Total population:

2,531

 

 

Township map of Wichita County, 2000

Population:

1880

(14)

1890

(1,827)

1900

(1,197)

1910

(2,006)

1920

(1,856)

1930

(2,579)

1940

(2,185)

1950

(2,640)

1960

(2,765)

1970

(3,274)

1980

(3,041)

1990

(2,758)

2000

(2,531)

 

 

Wilson County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

September 24, 1864

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Wilson County

Boundaries:

Wilson County as originally laid out was twenty-four miles square along the southern boundary of the state, the territory which today comprises Montgomery County. Later in the same year [1855], the legislature expanded the county 26 miles northward to its present northern line; in 1867, the southern half was carved off to form Montgomery County.

County Seat:

Fredonia

Origin of Name:

In honor of Col. Hiero T. Wilson (1806-1892), settler, postmaster, and prominent citizen of Fort Scott.

History:

When originally created, the county was within the Osage Reserve and not open to white settlement. However, settlers began arriving as early as 1857. No attempt was made to organize the county until 1864, when an ambitious New Yorker named Daniel C. Finn arrived in the region and began agitating the question. On 9 Sept 1864, Finn presented a petition for organization to the governor, who appointed the first slate of county officers. Several of those appointed failed to qualify, and the first meeting of the county commissioners did not take place until January 1867. The question of a county seat caused eight elections between 1867 and 1873; Coy's Store [Coyville], Kalida [Clifton], Twin Mounds [Fredonia], Neodesha, and Center each won at least one election. The matter was finally settled in Fredonia's favor.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Fredonia (city)

2,600

Neodesha (city)

2,848

Cedar Township

701

Center Township

618

Chetopa Township

188

Clifton Township

414

Colfax Township

452

Duck Creek Township

103

Fall River Township

398

Guilford Township

205

Neodesha Township

583

Newark Township

226

Pleasant Valley Township

201

Prairie Township

118

Talleyrand Township

232

Verdigris Township

394

Webster Township

51

Total population:

10,332

 

 

Township map of Wilson County, 2000

Population:

1860

(27)

1870

(6,694)

1880

(13,775)

1890

(15,286)

1900

(15,621)

1910

(19,810)

1920

(21,157)

1930

(18,646)

1940

(17,723)

1950

(14,815)

1960

(13,077)

1970

(11,317)

1980

(12,128)

1990

(10,289)

2000

(10,332)

 

 

Woodson County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Woodson County

County Seat:

Yates Center

Origin of Name:

Most likely named for Daniel Woodson (1824-1894), who served as secretary of Kansas Territory, 1854-1857, including four stints as acting governor.  Some other sources suggest it was named for Silas Woodson (1819-1896), a lawyer and politician in St. Joseph, Missouri, who served as governor of that state in the 1870s.

History:

Neosho Falls was the original county seat (1858-1873).  Kalida was the seat from 1873 to 1874, when it moved to Defiance.  Yates Center became the seat after the election of 12 Sept 1876.

Interesting places:

The courthouse square in Yates Center is an American classic. Over fifty buildings and stores are on the National Register of Historic Places.

Frannie's in Yates Center is still "the" place to eat.  Customer's pay one dollar (plus tax!) and put their money directly into the open cash register.

The town of Kalida, about three miles from Yates Center, pretty much vanished in the 1870s, but fascinating stone structures remain.

Just north of Yates Center on Highway 75 there's a well-preserved octagonal wooden barn.

Piqua was the birthplace of Buster Keaton. His parents happened to be "playing" the town with a medicine show when the time came; they left two weeks later. There is a local Buster Keaton Museum.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Yates Center (city)

1,599

Belmont Township

[defunct]

Center Township

594

Eminence Township

[defunct]

Everett Township

[defunct]

Liberty Township

200

Neosho Falls Township

537

North Township

71

Owl Creek Township

[defunct]

Perry Township

103

Toronto Township

684

Total population:

3,788

 

 

Township map of Woodson County, 2000

Population:

1860

(1,488)

1870

(3,827)

1880

(6,535)

1890

(9,021)

1900

(10,022)

1910

(9,450)

1920

(8,984)

1930

(8,526)

1940

(8,014)

1950

(6,711)

1960

(5,423)

1970

(4,789)

1980

(4,600)

1990

(4,116)

2000

(3,788)

 

 

Wyandotte County, Kansas

Date Established:

January 29, 1859

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Wyandotte County

County Seat:

Kansas City

Origin of Name:

Organized in 1855. County Seat, Kansas City (formerly Wyandotte). Named after the Indian tribe of that name.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Bonner Springs (city)

6,767

Kansas City (city)

146,866

Lake Quivira (city)

49

Delaware Township

4,200

Prairie Township

[defunct]

Wyandotte Township

[defunct]

Total population:

157,882

 

 

Township map of Wyandotte County, 2000

Population:

1860

(2,609)

1870

(10,015)

1880

(19,143)

1890

(54,407)

1900

(73,227)

1910

(100,068)

1920

(122,218)

1930

(141,211)

1940

(145,071)

1950

(165,318)

1960

(185,495)

1970

(186,845)

1980

(172,335)

1990

(161,993)

2000

(157,882)

 

 

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