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12/29/10

 

 

 

Kansas

COUNTY FACTS

Page 1

Click on the county name below to see the county facts:

ALLEN
ANDERSON
ATCHISON
BARBER
BARTON
BOURBON
BROWN
BUTLER
CHASE
CHAUTAUQUA
CHEROKEE
CHEYENNE
CLARK
CLAY
CLOUD
COFFEY
COMANCHE

Allen County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

May 07, 1856

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Allen County

Boundaries:

In July of 1855, the Territorial Legislature fixed the boundaries as follows: commencing at the southeast corner of Anderson County, then south thirty miles, west twenty-four miles, north thirty miles, and east to the place of beginning.

County Seat:

Iola

Origin of Name:

Named for William Allen (1803-1879), an Ohio senator and governor.

History:

The county seat was located at Cofachique from 1855 to 1857. Due to the decline in population of Cofachique, the county seat was moved to Humboldt in 1858. Humboldt was again the victor in 1860, but another county-seat election in 1865 resulted in the re-location of the county seat to Iola. The town company of Iola donated 100 lots to the county to aid in the construction of public buildings. The courthouse was purchased in 1877 for $1800 and the old courthouse was sold to the school district for $500.

The first railroads were built in Allen County in 1870--the Missouri, Kansas and Texas R.R. across the southwestern part and the Leavenworth, Lawrence and Galveston across the county from north to south on the east side of the Neosho River.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Humboldt (city)

1,999

Iola (city)

6,302

La Harpe (city)

706

Carlyle Township

276

Cottage Grove Township

282

Deer Creek Township

142

Elm Township

1,259

Elsmore Township

460

Geneva Township

172

Humboldt Township

273

Iola Township

843

Logan Township

225

Marmaton Township

853

Osage Township

316

Salem Township

277

Total population:

14,385

 

 

Township map of Allen County, 2000

Population:

1860

(3,082)

1870

(7,022)

1880

(11,303)

1890

(13,509)

1900

(19,507)

1910

(27,640)

1920

(23,509)

1930

(21,391)

1940

(19,874)

1950

(18,187)

1960

(16,369)

1970

(15,043)

1980

(15,654)

1990

(14,638)

2000

(14,385)

 

 

Anderson County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

January 07, 1856

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Anderson County

Boundaries:

Anderson County is twenty-four miles square. It is located in the second tier of counties west of Missouri, fifty miles south of the Kansas River and seventy miles north of Oklahoma.

County Seat:

Garnett

Origin of Name:

Named for Joseph C. Anderson, member of the territorial legislature and speaker pro tem of the House.

History:

Prior to 1854, the territory that became Anderson County was part of the Kansas Reserve of the Pottawatomie Indians, who were removed from Indiana in 1837 by the U.S. government. Their principal village was just across the northern boundary in Franklin County, at the place known as Dutch Henry's Crossing on Pottawatomie Creek. The first Euro-American settlement in the county began early in May, 1854, on what later became the site of the town of Greeley.

The first town in the county was named Kansas City, and was located on Iantha Creek on the west half of section 27 and the east half of section 28, township 19 south, range 18 east. Dr. G.W. Cooper, from Louisville, Kentucky, laid out the town in May 1856; its name was soon changed to Iantha.

The town of Shannon, located in section 31, township 20, range 20 and named in honor of territorial governor Wilson Shannon, was named the county seat in 1856. The town was surveyed in 1857 by Dr. Preston Bowen, and construction of county buildings began, but in 1859 the county seat was removed to Garnett and the Shannon town site was soon abandoned.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Garnett (city)

3,368

Indian Creek Township

132

Jackson Township

453

Lincoln Township

208

Lone Elm Township

239

Monroe Township

349

North Rich Township

112

Ozark Township

565

Putnam Township

284

Reeder Township

427

Rich Township

346

Union Township

[defunct]

Walker Township

668

Washington Township

268

Welda Township

301

Westphalia Township

390

Total population:

8,110

 

 

Township map of Anderson County, 2000

Population:

1860

(2,400)

1870

(5,220)

1880

(9,057)

1890

(14,203)

1900

(13,938)

1910

(13,829)

1920

(12,986)

1930

(13,355)

1940

(11,658)

1950

(10,267)

1960

(9,035)

1970

(8,501)

1980

(8,749)

1990

(7,803)

2000

(8,110)

 

 

Atchison County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

September 17, 1855

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Atchison County

County Seat:

Atchison

Origin of Name:

Named for David Rice Atchison (1807-1886), United States senator from Missouri at the time of the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

History:

French explorers and trappers were the first Europeans to journey across what became Atchison County. Etienne de Bourgmont, military commander of the French colony of Louisiana, led the first recorded expedition to the region in the summer of 1724, although others had probably visited before him. The next recorded explorer was Perin du Luc, who reached the area in 1802-1803.

Perhaps the most famed explorers of Atchison County were Lewis and Clark, whose expedition travelled up the Missouri River in the summer of 1804. On the eventing of July 4th, the company discovered a creek in the northeast corner of the county, naming it Independence Creek in honor of the holiday.

Paschal Pensoneau (or Pensinau) was the first settler to take up permanent residence in the county, settling along Stranger Creek in 1839. Five years later he opened a trading post and a farm.

When Kansas Territory was opened for settlement in 1854, the townsite of Atchison was founded by Senator Atchison and his friends, and dedicated on July 4, 1854. The town of Sumner, twelve miles to the south, attempted to replace Atchison as the county seat in 1858, but the proposal was soundly defeated.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Atchison (city)

10,232

Benton Township

1,076

Center Township

676

Grasshopper Township

588

Kapioma Township

271

Lancaster Township

922

Mount Pleasant Township

829

Shannon Township

1,753

Walnut Township

427

Total population:

16,774

 

 

Township map of Atchison County, 2000

Population:

1860

(7,729)

1870

(15,507)

1880

(26,668)

1890

(26,758)

1900

(28,606)

1910

(28,107)

1920

(23,411)

1930

(23,945)

1940

(22,222)

1950

(21,496)

1960

(20,898)

1970

(19,165)

1980

(18,397)

1990

(16,932)

2000

(16,774)

 

 

Barber County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

July 07, 1873

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Barber County

Boundaries:

The county is nearly in the form of a rectangle, with Kingman County cutting out a six-mile-square block in the northwest corner. The county is thirty-three miles north to south and thirty-six from east to west, with a total area of 1,134 square miles.

County Seat:

Medicine Lodge

Origin of Name:

Named for Thomas W. Barber, a Free State settler in Douglas County, who was killed by pro-slavery forces near Lawrence on 6 December 1855.

History:

Name spelled 'Barbour' until it was changed by the Legislature in 1883.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Aetna Township

3

Cedar Township

[defunct]

Deerhead Township

11

Eagle Township

42

Elm Mills Township

106

Elwood Township

275

Hazelton Township

213

Kiowa Township

1,164

Lake City Township

83

McAdoo Township

29

Medicine Lodge Township

2,573

Mingona Township

57

Moore Township

32

Nippawalla Township

26

Ridge Township

4

Sharon Township

369

Sun City Township

100

Turkey Creek Township

37

Valley Township

183

Total population:

5,307

 

 

Township map of Barber County, 2000

Population:

1880

(2,661)

1890

(7,973)

1900

(6,594)

1910

(9,916)

1920

(9,739)

1930

(10,178)

1940

(9,073)

1950

(8,521)

1960

(8,713)

1970

(7,016)

1980

(6,548)

1990

(5,874)

2000

(5,307)

 

 

Barton County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

May 16, 1872

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Barton County

Boundaries:

On 15 May 1875, the southern boundary was moved south to encompass the northern half of Stafford County; on 25 April 1879, Stafford County was reestablished.

County Seat:

Great Bend

Origin of Name:

Named for Clara Harlowe Barton (1821-1912), Civil War nurse and founder of the American Red Cross.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Ellinwood (city)

2,164

Great Bend (city)

15,345

Hoisington (city)

2,975

Albion Township

58

Beaver Township

108

Buffalo Township

490

Cheyenne Township

238

Clarence Township

125

Cleveland Township

69

Comanche Township

452

Eureka Township

116

Fairview Township

129

Grant Township

79

Great Bend Township

1,839

Independent Township

844

Lakin Township

299

Liberty Township

321

Logan Township

176

North Homestead Township

133

Pawnee Rock Township

544

South Bend Township

682

South Homestead Township

343

Union Township

128

Walnut Township

474

Wheatland Township

74

Total population:

28,205

 

 

Township map of Barton County, 2000

Population:

1870

(2)

1880

(10,318)

1890

(13,172)

1900

(13,784)

1910

(17,876)

1920

(18,422)

1930

(19,776)

1940

(25,010)

1950

(29,909)

1960

(32,368)

1970

(30,663)

1980

(31,343)

1990

(29,382)

2000

(28,205)

 

 

Bourbon County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

September 12, 1855

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Bourbon County

County Seat:

Fort Scott

Origin of Name:

Named for Bourbon County, Kentucky, the birthplace of Col. Samuel A. Williams, a member of the Kansas House of Representatives from Fort Scott in 1855, who requested that the county be so named. The Kentucky county, created in 1785, was itself named for the Bourbon dynasty of France, in commemoration of French aid to the American cause during the Revolutionary War.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Fort Scott (city)

8,297

Drywood Township

394

Franklin Township

312

Freedom Township

505

Marion Township

1,165

Marmaton Township

815

Mill Creek Township

472

Osage Township

394

Pawnee Township

308

Scott Township

2,326

Timberhill Township

256

Walnut Township

135

Total population:

15,379

 

 

Township map of Bourbon County, 2000

Population:

1860

(6,101)

1870

(15,076)

1880

(19,591)

1890

(28,575)

1900

(24,712)

1910

(24,007)

1920

(23,198)

1930

(22,386)

1940

(20,944)

1950

(19,153)

1960

(16,090)

1970

(15,215)

1980

(15,969)

1990

(14,966)

2000

(15,379)

 

 

Brown County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Brown County

County Seat:

Hiawatha

Origin of Name:

In the 1870s, the secretary of the state Board of Agriculture attempted to determine for whom the county was named. Several of the legislators in the 1855 session declared the county was named for Albert Gallatin Brown (1813-1880), United States senator from Mississippi at the time of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Other legislators, however, stated it was named for O. H. Browne, a member of that legislature.

History:

The county name was spelled Browne in the original statute, but the county seal omitted the 'e', as have all subsequent statutes.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Hiawatha (city)

3,417

Horton (city)

1,967

Sabetha (city)

7

Hamlin Township

344

Hiawatha Township

739

Irving Township

311

Mission Township

645

Morrill Township

503

Padonia Township

259

Powhattan Township

874

Robinson Township

452

Walnut Township

665

Washington Township

541

Total population:

10,724

 

 

Township map of Brown County, 2000

Population:

1860

(2,607)

1870

(6,823)

1880

(12,817)

1890

(20,319)

1900

(22,369)

1910

(21,314)

1920

(20,949)

1930

(20,553)

1940

(17,395)

1950

(14,651)

1960

(13,229)

1970

(11,685)

1980

(11,955)

1990

(11,128)

2000

(10,724)

 

 

Butler County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Butler County

County Seat:

El Dorado

Origin of Name:

Named for Andrew Pickens Butler (1796-1857), United States senator from South Carolina at the time of the Kansas-Nebraska Act organizing Kansas Territory. 

History:

Organized in 1855.  Butler County is named for Sen. Andrew Pickens Butler (1796-1857) of South Carolina from 1846 to 1857. Senator Butler was an ardent proslavery advocate although he had voted for the Kansas-Nebraska Act, perhaps thinking like many others that Kansas would become a slave state and Nebraska a free state.
 
Butler County was one of the 33 original counties created by the "Bogus Legislature" composed of pro-slavery Missourians, border state ruffians and the fraudulently elected. A later Free State legislature allowed the name to remain unchanged. One account states that they thought Butler County was named after Massachusetts politician and later Union Army General, Ben Butler.
 
Since the early days, the regional economy had been focused on farming and ranching. This would all change when, in the fall of 1915, a cable tool drilling rig owned by Wichita Natural Gas began to drill an oil well on the John Stapleton farm north of town. Day after day the tools stomped their way into the solid earth until at a depth of 670 feet oil was discovered. Word spread like a wind-whipped prairie fire and the black gold rush was on.
 
Butler's economy changed almost overnight. Lease prices for land skyrocketed as men sought riches from deep within the earth. New shops and businesses were built to meet the demands of thousands of incoming workers.
 
The company owned towns of Oil Hill, Midian, Gordon, Browntown and others prospered. Oil Hill and El Dorado grew and by 1918 their population totaled almost 20,000. In a single year, more than 28 million barrels of crude oil were produced.

 

Butler County, Kansas' largest, is mostly rolling grass-covered hills with broad river valleys winding through them. Elevations range from 1625 feet on the east Flint Hills escarpment down to 1148 feet in the Walnut River valley.
 
Petroleum production and refining is still the major factor in the county's economy. Farming and ranching are also important, and the state correctional facility and light industry are growing segments.

 

- information supplied by the Butler County Historical Society

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Augusta (city)

8,423

El Dorado (city)

12,057

Augusta Township

1,405

Benton Township

2,211

Bloomington Township

544

Bruno Township

9,744

Chelsea Township

190

Clay Township

83

Clifford Township

259

Douglass Township

2,306

El Dorado Township

1,700

Fairmount Township

511

Fairview Township

491

Glencoe Township

239

Hickory Township

90

Lincoln Township

317

Little Walnut Township

1,002

Logan Township

154

Milton Township

1,136

Murdock Township

378

Pleasant Township

4,649

Plum Grove Township

661

Prospect Township

2,033

Richland Township

2,399

Rock Creek Township

299

Rosalia Township

589

Spring Township

1,566

Sycamore Township

333

Towanda Township

2,727

Union Township

226

Walnut Township

760

Total population:

59,482

 

 

Township map of Butler County, 2000

Population:

1860

(437)

1870

(3,035)

1880

(18,586)

1890

(24,055)

1900

(23,363)

1910

(23,059)

1920

(43,842)

1930

(35,904)

1940

(32,013)

1950

(31,001)

1960

(38,395)

1970

(38,658)

1980

(44,782)

1990

(50,580)

2000

(59,482)

 

 

Chase County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 11, 1859

Date Organized:

March 15, 1859

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Chase County

County Seat:

Cottonwood Falls

Origin of Name:

Named for Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873), in turn governor of Ohio, United States senator, Secretary of the Treasury, and chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

History:

Organized in 1859. County seat, Cottonwood Falls. Created out of portions of Wise and Butler counties, and named in honor of Salmon P. Chase.  In the Senate, he was earnest in his opposition to the extension of slavery into Kansas.

 

Chase County contains vast areas of unspoiled prairie, used and managed as grasslands since it was settled.  In the spring, after the pastures have been burnt, some of the hills look like they are all rock without enough soil to support life, and it's easy to see where the name Flint Hills came from.  Later, by the end of May, the harshness is buried in a thick carpet of wildflowers and lush bluestem grasses.
 
Sharp's Creek Drive is probably the prettiest drive in the county, if not the state.  Head south and east from Bazaar and go at least a couple of miles beyond the Kansas Turnpike onto the open range to experience what the first settlers must have seen and felt.  If you travel east from Matfield Green you can still ford the Verdigris River.  The road west from Matfield Green through Wonsevu to Burns in Marion County provides a similar experience.  Stop somewhere and savor the solitude and silence.  If you can't visit, William Least Heat-Moon's 1991 book, Prairy Erth, captures the spirit of the land.  Wagon train tours through the Flint Hills are another nice way to experience this area.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Bazaar Township

81

Cedar Township

116

Cottonwood Township

184

Diamond Creek Township

237

Falls Township

1,163

Homestead Township

52

Matfield Township

155

Strong Township

740

Toledo Township

302

Total population:

3,030

 

 

Township map of Chase County, 2000

Population:

1860

(808)

1870

(1,975)

1880

(6,081)

1890

(8,233)

1900

(8,246)

1910

(7,527)

1920

(7,144)

1930

(6,952)

1940

(6,345)

1950

(4,831)

1960

(3,921)

1970

(3,408)

1980

(3,309)

1990

(3,021)

2000

(3,030)

 

 

Chautauqua County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 25, 1875

Date Organized:

June 01, 1875

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Chautauqua County

County Seat:

Sedan

Origin of Name:

Named for Chautauqua County, New York, the birthplace of Edward Jaquins, a member of the Kansas House who in 1875 introduced the bill dividing Howard County into Elk and Chautauqua. The New York county, in turn, derives its name from an Indian word meaning 'foggy place.'

History:

Organized in 1875.  Created out of a portion of what was first Godfrey county, named after "Bill" Godfrey. a noted trader among the Osages; then Howard county in honor of Major-General O. O. Howard, for his efforts in behalf of the Union.  Chautauqua county N.Y., was the former home of Hon. Edward Jaquins, a member of the Kansas Legislature in 1875 from Howard county, who introduced the bill which divided Howard into Chautauqua and Elk; hence, from his native place this county derives its name.  The name originally given (in 1855) to Howard was Godfrey, and the name changed to Seward in 1861.  In 1867 the Legislature, ignoring former names, created the county of Howard.

Chautauqua County is mostly covered with rocky, oak-covered hills.  Big valleys, particularly the valley of the Caney River, have rich and fertile farms and some of the hills are clear and home to thousands of grazing cattle.  The spectacular beauty and ruggedness of the countryside make it a great place for outdoor vacations.  Steve Harper's book of Kansas day trips has a nice tour of the County.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Belleville Township

675

Caneyville Township

88

Center Township

75

Harrison Township

114

Hendricks Township

179

Jefferson Township

834

Lafayette Township

65

Little Caney Township

353

Salt Creek Township

123

Sedan Township

1,660

Summit Township

106

Washington Township

87

Total population:

4,359

 

 

Township map of Chautauqua County, 2000

Population:

1880

(11,072)

1890

(12,297)

1900

(11,804)

1910

(11,429)

1920

(11,598)

1930

(10,352)

1940

(9,233)

1950

(7,376)

1960

(5,956)

1970

(4,642)

1980

(5,016)

1990

(4,407)

2000

(4,359)

 

 

Cherokee County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 18, 1860

Date Organized:

August 03, 1866

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Cherokee County

County Seat:

Columbus

Origin of Name:

Named for the Cherokee Indian tribe, who by a treaty signed in 1835 held the 'Cherokee Neutral Lands,' a strip 50 miles north to south and 25 miles across, comprising all of Cherokee, most of Crawford, and a slice of Bourbon County. In 1866, another treaty ceded the Neutral Lands to the United States.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Baxter Springs (city)

4,602

Columbus (city)

3,396

Galena (city)

3,287

Scammon (city)

496

Weir (city)

780

Cherokee Township

336

Crawford Township

646

Garden Township

3,039

Lola Township

382

Lowell Township

672

Lyon Township

528

Mineral Township

254

Neosho Township

306

Pleasant View Township

658

Ross Township

893

Salamanca Township

569

Shawnee Township

505

Sheridan Township

249

Spring Valley Township

1,007

Total population:

22,605

 

 

Township map of Cherokee County, 2000

Population:

1860

(1,501)

1870

(11,038)

1880

(21,905)

1890

(27,770)

1900

(42,694)

1910

(38,162)

1920

(33,609)

1930

(31,457)

1940

(29,817)

1950

(25,144)

1960

(22,279)

1970

(21,549)

1980

(22,304)

1990

(21,374)

2000

(22,605

 

 

Cheyenne County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 20, 1873

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Cheyenne County

County Seat:

St. Francis

Origin of Name:

Named for the Cheyenne Indian tribe, buffalo-hunters who roamed the plains of western Kansas and Nebraska south to the Arkansas River.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Alexander Township

[defunct]

Beaver Township

[defunct]

Benkelman Township

57

Bird City Township

771

Calhoun Township

57

Cherry Creek Township

[defunct]

Cleveland Run Township

67

Dent Township

[defunct]

Eureka Township

[defunct]

Evergreen Township

[defunct]

Jaqua Township

46

Jefferson Township

[defunct]

Lawn Ridge Township

[defunct]

Nutty Combe Township

[defunct]

Orlando Township

63

Porter Township

[defunct]

Wano Township

2,104

Total population:

3,165

 

 

Township map of Cheyenne County, 2000

Population:

1880

(37)

1890

(4,401)

1900

(2,640)

1910

(4,248)

1920

(5,587)

1930

(6,948)

1940

(6,221)

1950

(5,668)

1960

(4,708)

1970

(4,256)

1980

(3,678)

1990

(3,243)

2000

(3,165)

 

 

Clark County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Clark County

County Seat:

Ashland

Origin of Name:

In honor of Charles F. Clarke, captain of Co. F, Sixth Kansas Cavalry. Promoted to Ass't Adjutant General in the U.S. Volunteers, he died at Memphis, Tenn., on 10 Dec 1862.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Appleton Township

921

Brown Township

[defunct]

Center Township

1,097

Cimarron Township

[defunct]

Edwards Township

[defunct]

Englewood Township

171

Lexington Township

83

Liberty Township

32

Sitka Township

86

Vesta Township

[defunct]

Total population:

2,390

 

 

Township map of Clark County, 2000

Population:

1880

(163)

1890

(2,357)

1900

(1,701)

1910

(4,093)

1920

(4,989)

1930

(4,796)

1940

(4,081)

1950

(3,946)

1960

(3,396)

1970

(2,896)

1980

(2,599)

1990

(2,418)

2000

(2,390)

 

 

Clay County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 20, 1857

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Clay County

County Seat:

Clay Center

Origin of Name:

In honor of Henry Clay (1777-1852), statesman and senator from Kentucky.

History:

Organized in 1866.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Clay Center (city)

4,564

Athelstane Township

144

Blaine Township

259

Bloom Township

125

Chapman Township

202

Clay Center Township

368

Exeter Township

81

Five Creeks Township

159

Garfield Township

107

Gill Township

140

Goshen Township

92

Grant Township

132

Hayes Township

206

Highland Township

310

Mulberry Township

331

Oakland Township

110

Republican Township

1,024

Sherman Township

328

Union Township

140

Total population:

8,822

 

 

Township map of Clay County, 2000

Population:

1860

(163)

1870

(2,942)

1880

(12,320)

1890

(16,146)

1900

(15,833)

1910

(15,251)

1920

(14,365)

1930

(14,556)

1940

(13,281)

1950

(11,697)

1960

(10,675)

1970

(9,890)

1980

(9,802)

1990

(9,158)

2000

(8,822)

 

 

Cloud County, Kansas

Date Established:

March 27, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Cloud County

County Seat:

Concordia

Origin of Name:

In honor of William F. Cloud (1825-1905), colonel of the Second Kansas Cavalry during the Civil War.

History:

Organized as Shirley in 1860.  The county was originally named for Governor William Shirley, colonial Governor of Massachusetts from 1741 to 1756.  The name was changed to Cloud in 1867 in honor of Colonel William F. Cloud, of the Second Regiment, Kansas Volunteers.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Concordia (city)

5,714

Arion Township

105

Aurora Township

169

Buffalo Township

119

Center Township

172

Colfax Township

49

Elk Township

845

Grant Township

479

Lawrence Township

146

Lincoln Township

378

Lyon Township

103

Meredith Township

77

Nelson Township

137

Oakland Township

52

Shirley Township

178

Sibley Township

178

Solomon Township

664

Starr Township

653

Summit Township

50

Total population:

10,268

 

 

Township map of Cloud County, 2000

Population:

1870

(2,323)

1880

(15,343)

1890

(19,295)

1900

(18,071)

1910

(18,388)

1920

(17,714)

1930

(18,006)

1940

(17,247)

1950

(16,104)

1960

(14,407)

1970

(13,466)

1980

(12,494)

1990

(11,023)

2000

(10,268)

 

 

Coffey County, Kansas

Date Established:

August 25, 1855

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Coffey County

County Seat:

Burlington

Origin of Name:

Organized in 1859.  In honor of Col. A. M. Coffey, a member of the Legislative Council of Kansas Territory.  Colonel Coffey died at Dodge City in 1879.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Burlington (city)

2,790

Avon Township

183

Burlington Township

300

California Township

[defunct]

Hampden Township

114

Key West Township

237

Le Roy Township

669

Liberty Township

634

Lincoln Township

1,268

Neosho Township

140

Ottumwa Township

740

Pleasant Township

272

Pottawatomie Township

217

Rock Creek Township

1,025

Spring Creek Township

118

Star Township

158

Total population:

8,865

 

 

Township map of Coffey County, 2000

Population:

1860

(2,842)

1870

(6,201)

1880

(11,438)

1890

(15,856)

1900

(16,643)

1910

(15,205)

1920

(14,254)

1930

(13,653)

1940

(12,278)

1950

(10,408)

1960

(8,403)

1970

(7,397)

1980

(9,370)

1990

(8,404)

2000

(8,865)

 

 

Comanche County, Kansas

Date Established:

February 26, 1867

Date Organized:

 

Location:

Kansas map showing location of Comanche County

County Seat:

Coldwater

Origin of Name:

Named for the Comanche Indians, a nomadic tribe of buffalo hunters on the southern plains.

History:

Organized February 27, 1885.  The county was first organized in 1873, under a general law then in force, and was represented in the Legislature under that organization in 1874, but that organization was held fraudulent and void.

Cities & Townships:

Place

Population (2000 census)

Avilla Township

58

Coldwater Township

1,086

Irwin Township

[defunct]

Logan Township

[defunct]

Nescatunga Township

[defunct]

Powell Township

89

Protection Township

734

Rumsey Township

[defunct]

Shimer Township

[defunct]

Valley Township

[defunct]

Total population:

1,967

 

 

Township map of Comanche County, 2000

Population:

1880

(372)

1890

(2,549)

1900

(1,619)

1910

(3,281)

1920

(5,302)

1930

(5,238)

1940

(4,412)

1950

(3,888)

1960

(3,271)

1970

(2,702)

1980

(2,554)

1990

(2,313)

2000

(1,967)

 

 

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